What is the Difference Between a Session Border Controller and a SIP Proxy?

session border controllerWe often find that our customers have a misconception of Session Border Controllers (SBC). Customers that request a SBC often times need a SIP Proxy rather than a true Session Border Controller.

In general, people think of SBCs as a proxy that can be used for routing, security, and
other types of network administration. Customers seeking some sort of routing
administration – Least Cost Routing, for example – will request an SBC, thinking that is
the solution to their need.

However, an SBC is actually a back-to-back user agent SIP application with a wide variety of other uses such as policy-based access control, transcoding, topology concealment, call accounting, QoS, and call quality statistics.

On the other hand, a SIP Proxy is an IP PBX component used for call functions such as routing. A SIP proxy will send SIP requests to the appropriate destination and return a response. SIP Proxies may also be used for registration, authorization, security, network control, and other call functions.

Download our SIP Proxy PDF to learn more. Or For a more detailed and technical explanation, visit Likewise.am.

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VoIP vs IP PBX

voipVoIP and IP PBX are terms that we use all the time, but despite similarities, they are not interchangeable. VoIP has evolved to be a very broad term covering a whole range of technologies, while IP PBX is more specific.

VoIP – Voice over Internet Protocol – describes any telephony system that uses Internet rather than PSTN. The term is used for many types of modern telephony that have replaced legacy systems.

IP PBX – Internet Protocol Private Branch Exchange – is a specific type of telephony system that switches calls between an internal data network and external networks.

IP PBX is a type of VoIP system.

To learn more, visit our products page or contact us today.

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What is a PBX System?

PBX System (Private Branch Exchange System) is a telephony solution that connects internal users to one another and to an outside PSTN telephone line. PBXs are used within organizations or enterprises to simplify communications and lessen costs.

pbx

As with all technology, PBX systems have evolved with new trends. IP PBX uses Internet Protocol or VoIP technology to make PBX systems more feature-rich, scalable, and affordable.

PBX systems are available in two different delivery formats: on-premise or hosted/cloud. This gives us several combination options:

  • On-Premise PBX
  • Hosted PBX
  • On-Premise IP PBX
  • Hosted IP PBX
  • Hybrid PBX
  • Hybrid IP PBX

We will explore the differences between some of these PBX solutions in our next post: On-Premise vs Cloud IP PBX Systems.

In the meantime, visit our website to learn about a real IP PBX System or read some of our related posts:

10 Ways to Protect Your IP PBX From Hackers

ip pbx securityIn response to a common VoIP security question, Digium provides ten ways to protect your IP PBX from hackers.

  1. Use a private network and exclude international calls from this network
  2. Ask your Service Provider to help restrict calling
  3. Use a firewall from the inside
  4. Verify IP addresses
  5. Never use the root user and disable login as such
  6. Create strong passwords and change frequently
  7. Close all ports that are not in use
  8. Run any susceptible services (for example, SSH) on non-standard ports
  9. Ask IT experts to protect platforms
  10. Never step learning about new security threats and protections

If this has piqued your interest or concern about VoIP security, check out VoIP Security: The Risks and How To Prevent Them.

IP PBX System Part 5: Conclusion

This is part of a series of posts from our newest whitepaper on IP PBX System.
Click here to view all posts in series.

ip pbx

A Bicom Systems Whitepaper examining On-Site and Hosted IP PBX Systems
November 2012
www.bicomsystems.com

PART FIVE

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, the past decade has opened the doors to a new era in which end users have various options of IPPBX systems. While on-site solutions remain a large part of the market, providers now have the option – and responsibility – to offer hosted solutions as well. Those who will make best headway will be those that can offer the best solution to whoever their next client is. Take this opportunity to begin offering more solutions today.

Other posts in this series:
Part 1: Introduction
Part 2: IP PBX System Options
Part 3: Example Scenarios
Part 4: Selling an IP PBX System
Part 5: Conclusion